Ashanti Reveals How Jennifer Lopez Stole & Ruined Her Career

Ashanti Reveals How Jennifer Lopez Stole & Ruined Her Career
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Jennifer Lopez announced that she will be releasing a new album in 2023, but me and a million other people are wondering, who will be singing in the album?

When she says this is me does it mean she will actually finally be singing the songs? Or will Ashanti be doing the work for her… again?! In fact, decades later fans still say that J. Lo stole Ashanti’s vocals and almost ruined Ashanti’s career.

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Let’s be real guys, J. Lo has always been slammed for stealing others, especially black artists’ vocals for her songs

Video:

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“My first impression of her was that she was probably the hungriest artist I had ever worked with or encountered,” says multiple-award-winning music producer Cory Rooney, who has worked with Michael Jackson and Destiny’s Child, of meeting Jennifer Lopez for the first time.

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The artist was about to turn 30, perhaps a little late by the music industry’s standards, but her commitment and talent were her calling card.

It had been a few years since the Bronx native had stopped dancing on TV shows to become a promising Hollywood actress; her turn as the ill-fated “queen of Tejano music” Selena Quintanilla was her best route to a meteoric career as a performer.

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But Lopez — whose own voice was discarded in the film’s final cut — decided to pursue an international singing career instead of acting in Hollywood.

Lopez’s successful but controversial first album, On the 6, was the first step to becoming one of the 10 most successful women in the history of the music industry, with an estimated fortune of $400 million and a media impact that continues to produce replicas 24 years later.

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When Lopez released If You Had My Love, the album’s first single, over a year had passed since the last time a woman had topped the charts (Britney Spears with Baby One More Time).

Lopez repeated the feat just a month after the song’s release. In addition to becoming one of the songs of the summer of 1999, it cemented Lopez’s privileged status, which she maintains to this day.

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Waiting for Tonight, Let’s Get Loud (co-written by Gloria Estefan) and No Me Ames [You Don’t Love Me] were other hits from an album praised by critics and the public alike, thanks to its mix of pop, disco, R&B, hip-hop and what the artist herself called “Latin soul” music.

Lopez never tried to hide her Latin roots (she brought the Puerto Rican flag to her first album launch and, 20 years later, to her Super Bowl performance) and her humble origins.

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The album’s title refers to the subway line (the 6) on which she traveled every day from the Bronx to Manhattan, seeking to live the American dream. “I had never recorded music.

I had only sung at shows and plays. It was one of those things where ignorance was bliss. I knew I was making an album, but you’re so young it’s not hitting you how big it is,” recalls Lopez.

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She headlined the Latin music explosion at the beginning of the century, which also included Ricky Martin, Marc Anthony, Shakira and Enrique Iglesias.

Lopez ended up cementing her stellar position at the Grammy Awards ceremony a few months after the LP’s release; that was where she wore the iconic green printed Versace dress with a slit that inspired the creation of Google images.

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